left me

United States | New York

Quadrantids Main


Guide to viewing Quadrantids in New York

The first major shower of 2013 is the Quadrantids meteor shower. This annual shower has one of the highest predicted hourly rates of all the major showers, and is comparable to the two of the liveliest showers of the year, the August Perseids and the December Geminids. This celestial event is active from December 28th through January 12th and peaks on the morning of January 3rd.

Those living in the northern hemisphere have an opportunity to experience a much better view of the Quadrantids, as the constellation Boötes (the radiant of the Quadrantids meteor shower) never makes it above the horizon in the southern hemisphere.

Moon phase is fair for gazing at the Quadrantids meteor shower. The peak of this shower coincides with a Waning Gibbous, so the moonlight may wash away the faintest Quadrantids meteors.While the light of the moon may reduce the quantity of meteors you'll be able to see, you should still be able to observe all but the faintest meteors.

Moon phase is fair for gazing at the Quadrantids meteor shower. The peak of this shower coincides with a Waning Gibbous, so the moonlight may wash away the faintest Quadrantids meteors.While the light of the moon may reduce the quantity of meteors you'll be able to see, you should still be able to observe all but the faintest meteors.

How do I get ready to watch Quadrantids?

To find the location of the radiant (the point in the sky from where the meteors appear to come from), we recommend you first find Polaris (a middling-bright star, also known as the North Star) and observe in close proximity to that area. On average, and under clear skies, observers should see 40 to 60 meteors per hour. However, every so often, these rates can exceed up to 80 meteors per hour in dark sky locations.

If you happen to live near a brightly lit city, we recommend that you drive away from the glow of city lights. For many meteor showers it is often recommended to look straight up, but for this year's Quadrantids we advise that observers face as low as possible toward the horizon without being looking at the ground. In other words, have the bottom of your field of view on the horizon.

Where and when should I look up at the sky?

While you can still catch meteors while looking straight up, you will have an improved opportunity to observe more by looking toward the horizon. We wish you a wonderful viewing experience, and hope that the first meteor shower display of 2013 packs in several surprises!

Those living in the northern hemisphere have an opportunity to experience a much better view of the Quadrantids, as the constellation Boötes (the radiant of the Quadrantids meteor shower) never makes it above the horizon.

Moon phase is fair for gazing at the Quadrantids meteor shower. The peak of this shower coincides with a Waning Gibbous, so the moonlight may wash away the faintest Quadrantids meteors.While the light of the moon may reduce the quantity of meteors you'll be able to see, you should still be able to observe all but the faintest meteors.

Moon phase is fair for gazing at the Quadrantids meteor shower. The peak of this shower coincides with a Waning Gibbous, so the moonlight may wash away the faintest Quadrantids meteors.While the light of the moon may reduce the quantity of meteors you'll be able to see, you should still be able to observe all but the faintest meteors.

Viewing Hours

9:00pm
to 4:30am (EST)
on August 25rg

Date of peak:
Morning of August 23
Night of August 23

Also observe on:
Morning of August 24

Meteors per hour:
30 to 80 meteors

Local Time Zone
UTC/GTM -8 hours

Meteor Shower Dates

  • Quadrantids
  • Lyrids
  • ETA Aquarids
  • Delta Aquarids
  • Perseids
  • Draconids
  • Orionids
  • South Taurids
  • North Taurits
  • Leonids
  • Geminids
  • JAN 23
  • APR 04
  • MAY 12
  • JUL 02
  • AUG 12
  • OCT 01
  • OCT 11
  • OCT 23
  • NOV 25
  • NOV 12
  • DEC 30
xx
 
 
 

dd

d

 



Moon Forecast: Waxing Crecent Moon

Good

39% Full: The peak of this shower coincides with a Waxing Crescent Moon, so the moonlight will not interfere with viewing most Perseids meteors. Moon is fair for gazing at the Perseids meteor shower.

Hemmisphere: Northern Hemisphere

Good

The Quadrantids meteor shower is best viewed on the Northern Hemisphere. Because most of New York is in the Northern Hemmisphere, you will have an optimal viewing opportunity.

A word of caution about viewing

Good

Several factors such as cloud cover, precipiration, and unnatural lighting may interfere with your viewwing exepreicne. The most important thing you need when watching a meteor shower is a dark sky.
Glossary
A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

A constellation is a group of stars forming a pattern. This patten is named after its apparent form or itentified with a mythological figure.

Constellation

Viewing Locations
.
Jones Beach State Park

Beach in Brooklyn, NY

.
Jones Beach State Park

Beach in Brooklyn, NY

.
Jones Beach State Park

Beach in Brooklyn, NY

.
Jones Beach State Park

Beach in Brooklyn, NY

.
Jones Beach State Park

Beach in Brooklyn, NY

.
Jones Beach State Park

Beach in Brooklyn, NY

Explore more dark sites
Constellation
Meet Draco, the dragon.

Every meteor shower has a radiant. The radiant is the point in the sky from which meteors appear to come from. The radiant of the Quadrantids meteor shower radiant lies within the consellation Bootes. Since a constellation is just a group of stars, finding the constellation Bootes in the sky will help you observe the Quadrantids meteor shower better.

Learn more about Draco
Quadrantids Skymap

Launch the Spacedex Skymap viewer for a visual look at observing the Quadrantids meteor shower.

Explore the Skymap

© 2014 Spacedex
About Spacedex
Privacy Policy